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Thread: AC coil cleaning machine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    San Antonio, Tx
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    Default AC coil cleaning machine

    question: I was watching one of your you tube videos of the 220 psi volcano carpet extractor setup and was wondering if you produce these , or just showing what can be done with the parts , pumps you sell.
    I own a air conditioner cleaning business and we specialize in split ducted type. I was looking into using steam and water pressure to effectively clean these quickly and without harsh chemicals.
    I think I would only need about 200 psi to get the job done as I don't want to bend up the coil fins. We normally use about 4 gallons cleaning one unit and about 10 minute run time. Do you think the heater could sustain a 10 min run ? We use a number 2 tip 45 degree.
    I am interested in ordering possibly 6 units if I can get some idea as to cost.
    Please let me know as soon as possible.
    Thank you
    Alan
    http://www.steam-brite.com/clean-sto...0-p-12680.html



    Answer: We do make this unit or you can purchase the parts yourself and assemble yourself. Please note that that this pump requires a 03 flow and is designed to use the customer supplied hot water. 220 psi will not bend the coils. You are more than welcome to use cold water and it will heat the water, but not to steam, rather more like a 60 degree F temperature rise. This pump will also suction feed itself out of a near by tank but naturally this means the outbound pressure will also be reduced. These are currently $918 for the 120 volt version. Adding for hoses and gun, nozzle would be extra.
    You also might want to try and adjustable nozzle like
    http://www.steam-brite.com/clean-sto...n-p-89963.html
    installed direct onto a gun with no lance
    http://www.steam-brite.com/mv925-eas...g-p-90045.html
    Another possibility is to use quick coupler jets
    visit
    http://www.steam-brite.com/pressure-...0-p-89826.html
    this snaps into
    http://www.steam-brite.com/female-co...s-p-77103.html
    We also have rotary nozzles
    http://www.steam-brite.com/clean-sto...e-p-90047.html
    These rotary turbo nozzles are really nice and improve the cleaning performance. If we build this system for you we can always test this nozzle with this pump and see if it works.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    San Antonio, Tx
    Posts
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    Default Ac coil cleaning business

    Question: Hello,
    I may be interested in purchasing one of your clean storm volcano units.
    I own an Air conditioning cleaning business and wanted to know if you think this setup would be able to clean ac evaporator coils effectively.
    Right now we are just using a 200 psi pump system to dislodge the contaminants , mold etc. In itself it is a great system but we also have to use some harsh chemicals to aid in the removal.
    We had thought about using steam in the past but realize the length of time it would take to clean a coil system would be too great to make the job worth while. Also we would need some high water pressure to effectively clean the blower fan on these units.
    I have seen in your video , the power of the machine and it is impressive, I am interested in how many GPM the pump is able to run and to what effective temperature.
    Typically , we only use the pressure spray for less than 10 minutes at a time and move around 5 gallons in that time.
    What is the wait time for the heater to get to temp ? How long before the temp drops to unacceptable levels?
    What do you expect the life of the machine to be ?
    We specialize in Split non ducted AC systems and are always trying different techniques. I feel this machine / system would give us a distinct advantage over the competition as hot water and steam can sanitize in one application.
    Please let me know what you think about the application
    Thank you
    Alan

    Answer: http://www.steam-brite.com/clean-sto...0-p-12680.html
    Thanks for your interest.
    This pump is designed to push .55 gpm when under pressure
    We have a flow charge listed at
    http://www.steam-brite.com/aquatec-t...d-p-10801.html
    The chart was taken using the pump suction feed the water out of a bucket. As you notice from the videos when you pressure feed the pump with water from a garden hose the building pressure will add about 75 psi to the pump pressure and let it perform at 250 psi.
    The heater only holds about 32 oz of water and since we are only feeding it 1800 watts of power, the temperature rise averages about 30 degrees hotter that what you feed it to start.
    This pump/heater combination was designed to be used for people that want to turn a shop vac into a carpet, upholstery, mattress, auto detail cleaning machine but we have already sold these to other AC companies that use this to clean coils in hotel rooms as well has home applications. Since this was designed to be feed with customer supplied hot water, and designed to take that already 120 degree F water to a new level of super hot water. Typically a carpet cleaner is performing a 2/3rd application stroke followed by a 1/3rd time dry stroke. This dry stroking allows the heater to build even more heat. In your application you will spray full time and probably starting with pressure feed cold garden hose water or possibly suction feet it from a bucket with hot tap water filled from the bath tub.
    The heating chamber will always attempt to build the heat up to 210 degrees F. So if you quit spraying or pre heat the unit, the 32 oz of water will go to 210 degree and provide 32 oz burst of steam. Then if you keep using water, it will just provide a temperature rise based on the flow rate through the system, an in bound starting water temperature. Many times customer want to know what these numbers are and you have to realize that question is actually thousands of questions as there is pressure feeding VS suction feeding / inbound starting temperatures / flow rate nozzle size / and spray time VS standby time. So we have no way to know how your application will work for you. The temperature is not adjustable. If the water is under 210 degrees F, the heater turns on, if it is over 210 the heater will automatically turn off. Example if I set down the spray gun, it will take 2 to 4 minutes to reach 210 degrees and turns itself off. When the operator starts working again, the heater will automatically turn back on again in its best efforts to provide temperature rise.
    All the components used in the build are replaceable. The replacement switch thermostats are under $20 each and the replacement heater rods are $55 each and both last between 1 to 2 years depending on use. You also have to de-scale the heater if using hard water or chemicals. If you suction feed chemicals through the pump, you will have to flush the pump with water before storing it with the understanding you will have to replace the rubber valves in the pump about once a year. If you just run water through the pump, the pump will last for years. http://www.steam-brite.com/aquatec-v...4-p-89055.html

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