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Water otter chemical injection

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  • Water otter chemical injection

    Question: Is there a way to add chemical injection to water otter for cleaning carpets? I have a cfx extractor and would like to add a pressure pump. Thanks, Dennis
    http://www.steam-brite.com/pumptec-8...ng-p-8956.html

    You can chemical injection to any pump by using an upstream injector.
    http://www.steam-brite.com/pressure-...3-p-10843.html
    You have to starve off the garden hose water so the pump converts from pressure feed to suction feed. As you starve off the garden hose the pump will look for a second source of liquid. Please note that upstream injectors have to be adjusted based on the jet size you use on your cleaning tool and the in-bound cleaning pressure on the building. If you over starve off the pump, you will shorten the life of the pump seals.

    Question: Thank you for the quick response. This looks like a good solution, but how do you measure/ monitor the amount of chemical being injected?

    Answer: You really don't. The up stream injector has a dial on it to adjust the speed of the pick up but no way to monitor the pick up. I used to super dilute my product and just let it suck it up...
    Last edited by Donald; January 28, 2014, 03:42 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Donald View Post
    Question: Is there a way to add chemical injection to water otter for cleaning carpets? I have a cfx extractor and would like to add a pressure pump. Thanks, Dennis
    http://www.steam-brite.com/pumptec-8...ng-p-8956.html

    You can chemical injection to any pump by using an upstream injector.
    http://www.steam-brite.com/pressure-...3-p-10843.html
    You have to starve off the garden hose water so the pump converts from pressure feed to suction feed. As you starve off the garden hose the pump will look for a second source of liquid. Please note that upstream injectors have to be adjusted based on the jet size you use on your cleaning tool and the in-bound cleaning pressure on the building. If you over starve off the pump, you will shorten the life of the pump seals.

    Question: Thank you for the quick response. This looks like a good solution, but how do you measure/ monitor the amount of chemical being injected?

    Answer: You really don't. The up stream injector has a dial on it to adjust the speed of the pick up but no way to monitor the pick up. I used to super dilute my product and just let it suck it up...


    Question: Donald, I'm also in the same situation as above. I have a modular carpet cleaning system with the garden hose coming directly in to the Mytee Water Hog (sitting in the van), then into the Little Giant Propane Heater (sitting in the van), and then on to the RX-20, which is then vacuumed up by a Mytee Air Hog Plus sitting outside the front door. I would like to get a chemical rinse (like Bridgepoint's EndZone) into the carpet cleaning solution while doing my extraction. The goal is to have the chemical injected into the stream after the pump and the heater, so as not to foul those systems up with the chemical. The Mytee Waterhog actually has a chemical feed feature, so if it worked I wouldn't mind getting some chemical in the Little Giant heater. Although, when I spoke to several pressure washer companies that specialized in the upstream chemical injectors, they said that considering the very small spray nozzles for carpet cleaning, and considering that we will be running upwards to 100-150 feet of pressure hose, it will create too much back pressure to make the venturi effect work, and the chemical will just sit there. I even tried hooking up a spare Hydroforce chemical injector right after the pump, but the GPM went from the 2.1 GPM that the Mytee Waterhog was producing on its own, all the way down to a little over 0.5 GPM (which is unacceptable for rinsing properly and quickly). Seems like the only way to do this properly is to have the chemical dump into a fresh water tank (like it does with portables), and have the chem and water run to the main pump and heater via a transfer pump. Looks like the physics of the situation just won't work with the chemical injector on the Mytee WaterHog or with an upstream injector. Unless you have any suggestions, it looks like we are just going to have to pre-treat the areas the best we can, and then just do a good fresh water rinse (which is not a bad thing - the system we have has been cleaning brilliantly this way for the last month since we bought it from you). Thanks!

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    • #3
      Up-stream VS. Downstream chemical injection

      You are correct in all your statements. In order to us up stream injectors (before the pump) you have to starve off the inbound water and open the jet flow up on the tools. To use down stream injectors (after the pump pressure like an injection sprayer/hydroforce) you are also starving off the water and opening up your spray jet size again. The up stream injectors will allow you to use at high pressure if you get the adjustment just right but down steam injectors are always low pressure. In both up stream and down steam chemical injection system need volume to really work. Low flow pump are hard to inject chemical. The Mytee water hog 4000 chemical injection system is down stream and requires a super large jetted spray lance. The auto fill systems used by most portable manufactures is located at
      http://www.steam-brite.com/dema-auto...bt-p-3993.html
      This has chemical metering tips that will allow you to adjust the mixture rates into your fresh tank. Tank/suction feeding your pump (as apposed to pressure feeding) will make your pump's use pressure drop off in performance.
      Upsteam injectors have to be adjusted each time the inbound water pressure changes or your jet size changes.

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